August, 2014


7
Aug 14

Wyoming law-regulators to look at poaching bills

A Wyoming legislative committee is getting ready talk about 2 proposed bills which would tighten up the state’s ability to engage in poaching as well as the penalties for those convicted. According to reports, the Joint Travel, Recreation, Wildlife and Cultural Resources Interim Committee would meet on Thursday in Thermopolis to consider bills for the legislative session that would take place next year.
A bill given before the committee would make it a state crime to knowingly trade, buy or sell illegally taken wildlife. Another bill would base the amount of damages paid by poachers on illegally taken wildlife’s economic value.
Those, who play an indirect role in poaching, can also be prosecuted under the federal law. But advocates of making it a state crime to wittingly traffic in illegally cracked wildlife say it would serve the authorities of Wyoming to crack down.
This proposal would make being tangled in poaching a high violation if the deal were valued at US$ 1000 or less than that. The crime would rise to an offense, punishable by up to ten years in jail along with a US$ 1,000 fine, if the dealings were valued at US$ 1000 or more than that.
Sen. Bruce Burns, committee co-chairman, told that if they could not catch the poacher himself and the animal was taken illegally, he does not know why people down the line should be benefiting from a crime. This would make wildlife regulations consistent with other criminal statutes.

A Wyoming legislative committee is getting ready talk about 2 proposed bills which would tighten up the state’s ability to engage in poaching as well as the penalties for those convicted. According to reports, the Joint Travel, Recreation, Wildlife and Cultural Resources Interim Committee would meet on Thursday in Thermopolis to consider bills for the legislative session that would take place next year.

A bill given before the committee would make it a state crime to knowingly trade, buy or sell illegally taken wildlife. Another bill would base the amount of damages paid by poachers on illegally taken wildlife’s economic value.

Those, who play an indirect role in poaching, can also be prosecuted under the federal law. But advocates of making it a state crime to wittingly traffic in illegally cracked wildlife say it would serve the authorities of Wyoming to crack down.

This proposal would make being tangled in poaching a high violation if the deal were valued at US$ 1000 or less than that. The crime would rise to an offense, punishable by up to ten years in jail along with a US$ 1,000 fine, if the dealings were valued at US$ 1000 or more than that.

Sen. Bruce Burns, committee co-chairman, told that if they could not catch the poacher himself and the animal was taken illegally, he does not know why people down the line should be benefiting from a crime. This would make wildlife regulations consistent with other criminal statutes.